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English 35
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate economies by means of common currency. this is not the first time these if things that happened. it happened in the united states of america. you have disparate economies in the united states of america that are
deficit. it is time for the president to step up. knowing this fiscal cliff was going to take place for well over a year, the president has not acted in good faith. what we are doing today is three things. number one, we are moving a centralized negotiation back to where it should become a decentralized basis, so 435 house members can vote and speak on it and express their baby opinion. hopefully the senate can take it and amend, but this debate belongs inside the united states capitol. last year, we heard so much about the 99%. this will give tax breaks to them. it is permanent. this is good for the economy. it is good for economic growth. i urge a yes vote on the rule. >> i have no further. >> gentleman from california. gentleman reserves his time. >> i cannot say it enough. the legislation is a step backward. plan b, plan c, neither is a serious proposal but are designed to get headlines. they are making it harder to find common sense solutions to the impending fiscal cliff. the time for the games is over. it is time the majority comes to the table with a serious proposal. as i s
-defense cuts, and you have this huge amount of revenue, deficit reduction, it is hard to see what demands the republicans think will be easier to make, the new year. guest: you have also seen all the polls that show that the president's popular the is close to an all-time high, and the polls show definitively that the republicans will be blinged if we go over the cliff and taxes go up. that was before the debacle of this past week. it has been a bad week for conservatives. it sounds to me like they're continuing to be a little delusional. host: when you make a public threat, you better be able to back up -- guest: washington wizards might have had a worse week. from a political standpoint, this was a monumental embarrassment for the speaker. host: i want to make sure i get the title of this correct. "the guide to the federal budget." how big is the federal budget? how much do take in? , to do spend? how much is $16 trillion? >> total payroll spending will be about $3.80 trillion. revenues will be about $2.80 trillion. we have a deficit of about $1 trillion. that is for fiscal 2013. that a
to our deficit in this country is rising health care costs. do we need to tangle those? how do they interact with the changes that are going to be set up across the country. is it going to cost the taxpayer more or less? all those have to be in the realm of realistic facts and figures. >> you're in arizona today. many of your constituents worked over the holidays. do you think congress should have stayed in washington to work for an agreement? >> absolutely. absolutely. once you know, once the boehner plan "b" collapsed, all we got was a notification, you can go home. we'll call you when we're ready. boehner's got to get off -- the majority of the majority must agree to something. it's going to take democratic votes to pass a tough fiscal compromise and unless there is inclusion and discussion on both sides of the aisle about this issue, that compromise gets tougher and tougher. >> thank you for coming "outfront." >> appreciate it. thank you. >> now, on the other side of the aisle. republican congressman of wisconsin. congressman, you just heard your arizona colleague say you a
hope they never come to a deal because this is the best deficit reduction package the democrats are ever going to get. but let's look at what really is going to happen here. i would be more surprised if they came to a deal in the next five days than i was by the roberts vote on obama care. there's no way these guys are going to come to a deal, and the reason is this. the president has got the upper hand, and his most important partner is the weakest person in this, which is john boehner. john boehner is on the verge of losing credibility with his caucus. he can't take a deal to his caucus that will pass without the help of nancy pelosi, which will pull the entire deal to the left. so what they have to do is they have to go over the cliff. we're just talking about politics, we're not talking about finances here. they have to go over the cliff. that strengthens boehner's hands because now everybody is paying a hell of a lot more taxes and people are blaming the republicans, and now boehner can go to the caucus and maybe get 200 and a few votes and then with nancy pelosi pick off a
taxation by using a flat tax. that way you can calculate the amount of taxes we need for the deficit over 10 years. another point is to control the spending on entitlements by not giving millionaires social security benefits, thereby satisfying president obama's approach. instead of doing it through taxation, he can do it through the entitlements. guest: those are both ideas that have been raised, especially the social security and medicare benefits for the wealthy and potentially might not need them to live off of. one tricky part of that is wealthier americans have been paying these taxes for decades into social security and medicare if and a lot of folks have a problem with the idea of taking away their benefits they have paid for if just because they happen to be more well off. and issued the first caller raised and something to watch is this could really sort of set the tone for the president's second term. if this thing gets ugly and stays ugly, it's probably going to stay that way at least another year or two, and the next thing you know, he's a lame duck president. if we cut a dea
the groundwork for further work on both growth and deficit reduction. that's an achievable goal. that can get done in ten days. >> wow. ten days. so, will the fiscal cliff solve in ten days? i know there's a deal out there some place it may not be until january, but let's ask our free market friday panel what they think. we have the columnist for the hill and former dnc communications director katie pavlitz. and mr. greenhaus is going to stay with us. all right, katie. first of all, obama basically said in ten days we can get a deal, it sounds like a small deal, 250,000 is the middle class threshold after mr. boehner's plan "b" got defeated. is such a thing possible? or will we have to wait until the new year? >> we're probably going to have to wait until the new year, unless, of course, president obama comes back with this new plan -- the original plan that he had, which as you mentioned the $250,000 threshold. the fact is that boehner and obama's proposals really aren't that far apart right now. president obama wants $1 trillion in new taxes, john boehner has said he's willing to give $1 tr
and there will still be an enormous amount of work to do both on deficit reduction and tax reform, not to mention dealing with massive spending cuts which by most accounts are not likely to be involved in the agreement. don't know that for sure, but that's our understanding going in, martin. >> i think it's a safe bet. both sides have different wants. so what's holding these two sides apart when the this he know that so very much is on the line for everyday americans? >> it's a great question. i mean, what's really holding them apart are massive ideological differences. this is about government's role in your life. democrats want more of a social safety net, republicans prioritize lower taxes. and that's what distinguishes the democratic and the republican parties sop so that's what they're fundamentally fighting about. if you break it down to the basic deal points right now, democrats say this smaller deal should include a tax increase for households that make $250,000 and more. an extension of unemployment benefits as you pointed out for about 2 million americans, a delay of those massive spend
that the government reduce its deficit as a condition for raising the debt ceiling. both democrats and republicans earth tactics that shut down the government and ultimately cost america its aaa credit rating for the first time in history. but in a last-minute compromise, both sides agree to a trillion dollars in spending cuts up front and another $1.2 trillion in cuts to be decided by a special congressional supercommittee. but a poison pill was attached. if the supercommittee can't reach a deal, automatic across the board cuts known as a sequester would go into effect be at the exact moment when those bush tax cuts extended for two years would expire. so the point is we could have all seen this coming and some of us did. we yelled at the top of our lungs about it but were drowned out by the election. it seems that good governance gets drowned out by continuous elections in america. this time there may be a serious price to pay for it. >> if we go off the fiscal cliff, be will you notice an immediate change to your wallet? we want to get a reality check from stephen moore, a member of the wall st
. that plan would have dealt with tax reform and deficit reduction and this will be a much more scaled back version that will deal with the issue of taxes and that is still the big sticking point, taxes. of course, democrats and president obama have called for tax rates to increase on those making $250,000 or less. republicans have said that's way too low. so they're thinking about potentially compromising on a rate that would be $400,000 or $500,000, but some republicans are saying they don't think that the tax rate should go up on anyone. so taxes still the major sticking point. right now the negotiations are going on the hill and there's a lot of optimism that came from the talks yesterday. of course, president obama hosted congressional leaders at the white house and they left that meeting and many said that it was constructive and they were optimistic that a deal could get done and i've been talking to my sources today and that same optimism isn't really present right now. there's more skepticism about a deal getting done and it is still very early in this process and this is a fluid s
getting close to some sort of a deal, a deal that would have dealt with deficit reduction as well as tax reform, but that all fell apart and now there's a big question mark about how they move forward and the president himself acknowledging when he addressed the nation on friday that given the tight timeframe, hopes for a larger deal have all, but faded and he's calling on congress to work together to just get a deal that would have at the very least extend lower tax rates for those making $250,000 or less and also to extend unemployment insurance and to help lay the groundwork for deficit reduction in the future. right now the expectations have been lowered a great deal in terms of what is actually possible and you heard the president say that he is still optimistic that something can get done before the january 1st deadline and of course, there's a lot of pressure for these lawmakers to get something done because if they don't the economy could go back into a recession eventa you willy. >> kristen well wiker with the president in hawaii. >>> joining me now from his home district in ver
during graham/rudman and i remember when they couldn't get deficit conversations right, treasuries went down and stocks went down. oh, would i love to get back to that type of reality. >> yeah. but you had a different guy at the federal reserve at the time. >> yeah, a different guy, you know, in hindsight he was maybe the monetizer in charge -- in chief, and we get a little historical perspective on that, but as many things that i disagree with alan greenspan on, i thought he was at least more forthright into what he was doing, and even going after the government per se a bit when there were tax issues, all av d avoided by the current chairman ben bernanke, and even though he avoids the conversation, he doesn't avoid giving congress the biggest fire hose in the world filled with free water. >> i love those kind of fire hoses on every corner, please. >> what's that, david? >> bernanke is the most aggressive fed governor we will ever know in the last 40 or 50 years with the monetary stimulation that began in november 2008. >> well her, needed to be? >> and that's likely to still be the o
is still available for 2 million people on that lays the groundwork for additional deficit reduction on economic growth steps that we can take in the new year but let's not miss this deadline. >> as for the two senate leaders, they spoke shortly after the meeting on sounded a bit more hopeful than the president. >> i think it was a very positive meeting. there was not a lot of hilarity in the meeting. everyone knows how important it is. it's a very serious meeting on it took an extended period of time, as you all know waiting for us. >> mr. president, i would just add -- i share the view of the majority leader, we had a good meeting down at the white house. we are engaged in discussion, the majority leader on myself on the white house >> -- so i'm hopeful. >> the american people are watching what we do here. obviously their patience is already thin. this is deja vu all over again. america wonders why it is that in this town for some reason you can't get stuff done in an organized timetable. why everything always has to wait till the last minute. well, we're now at the last minute and
for every bill they passed that would add to the deficit. and then they had to exempt themselves from their own rule for the very first bill they introduced when the war on women thing really picked up pace and the republicans' incessant focus on abortion stuff started to hurt the party politically. you remember john boehner insisting over and over again that this anti-abortion stuff was a democratic conspiracy. republicans were not focused on war on women at all, jobs, jobs, jobs. the furthest thing was the anti-abortion legislation. they weren't even working on that. all the while he was making that case, his own republicans kept introducing more and more and more and more anti-abortion legislation. forget what john boehner says. he doesn't speak for us. since john boehner has been speaker, since early 2011, the house has had real trouble just doing basic run of the mill governing stuff. bills failing unexpectedly and needing to be pulled at the last minute and tried again. the republican leadership's own legislation failing to get enough republican votes to pass. and that happening
. >> if this can make the deficit worse in a relatively small way. supermarkets are not going to be able to sell milk at $8 a gallon. the government will buy it at that price or a much higher price than it's paying now, under the 1949 law when cows were milked by hand instead of machines. it will have to sell that milk at a loss. >> yeah, and selling at a loss is going to do tremendous damage to that industry. what would the real world impact of a price hike like this be. >> if milk went up that much, you would see a huge change in the dietary habits of americans, including children. they would be drinking water and soda. remember we have all these sugary drinks that people are letting their children have. and you would see this big shift away from milk toward those kinds of drinks. the real underlying story here, i think the important one is about how we are seeing the way the republicans are likely to behave for the next two years, i think this is going to turn out to be an extraordinarily difficult and weird and unusual period in american history. >> david k. johnston, thank you for milking t
of detail he gave a week ago in a speech is basically derived from the larger deficit proposal offered over, really, the last couple years as president of the united states. we're waiting whether or not in the meeting, lasting an hour at the white house, started at 3:10, is whether or not they made progress towards changing that proposal in a fashion to pass the house of representatives or make it viable for some senate republicans to join with that. the president, the administration officials say they offered the proposal as a way to get republicans to come back with something else, they say. if not, the president wants this plan to be voted on in the house and to be voted on in the senate. this proposal is unlikely, would be making it through the house unless there's progress made off the president's opening offer, a very old offer, then we're in trouble. back to you david: that's why s&p futures went down after the bell, focused on what happens with no progress. that may change. the president is still meeting on both sides. we'll wait and see what happens when they come out if they give
the road. you know as well as i do this does nothing to deal with the $1 trillion plus deficits we have yearly. this is the fifth year in a row, we're going to have $20 trillion worth of debt on top of $48 trillion worth a long-term liabilities by the time mr. obama leaves office. this is the time to deal with this issue. we've been kicking it down the road ten years. we promised the nation in 2011 under the budget deal with the sequesters we would not let this get away from us. we shouldn't this time. for mr. obama to suggest i've cut a trillion in spending because he saved money on the wars in afghanistan is gimmicks. they a work. >> i have to be honest, it's both sides. it strikes me these lawmakers on either side don't have a real fix to what we're looking at, the national debt, screaming out of control. we're going to exceed that limit on monday night. >> i wouldn't disagree but look at the facts. we did have a republican controlled congress that passed a bill. if reid didn't like the bill, let it go for debate. let his senate vote it down and say no, we're not going to accept thes
the ground work for deficit reduction and economic growth steps that we can take in the new year. but let's not miss this deadline. >> as for the leaders they sounded a bit more hopeful than the president. >> i think it was a very positive meeting. there was not a lot of hilarity in the meeting. everyone knows how important it is. it is a very serious meeting and it would take an extended period of time as you know, waiting for us. >> i share the view of the majority leader. we had a good meeting down at the white house. we are engaged in discussions, the majority leader and myself and the white house, in the hopes that we can come forward as early as sunday and have a recommendation that i can make to my conference, and the majority leader can make to his conference. and so we'll be working hard to try to see if we can get there in the next 24 hours. and so i'm hopeful and optimistic. >> sounds good, but also sounds familiar, right? senator reid says a vote could happen on monday, but people have heard so much talk about the crisis but seen precious little action. the president tonight,
our economy and shrink the deficit. a balanced plan that would cut spending a responsible way, but also ask the wealthiest americans to pay a little more and protect the middle class and everyone striving to get into the middle class. i still want to get this cone. it's the right thing for our families. but the hour for immediate action is here. it is now. we're now at the point where in just four days, every american's tax rates are scheduled to go up by law. every american's paycheck will get considerably smaller. and that would be the wrong thing to do. it would be bad for middle class families and bad for businesses that depend on family spending. forchew nat ew fortunately, con can prevent it from happening. i just had a good discussion about how to prevent this tax hike on the middle class. and i'm optimistic we may still be able to reach an agreement that can pass both houses in time. senators reid and mcconnell are working on such an agreement as we speak. but if an agreement isn't reached in time between senator reid and senator mcconnell, then i will urge senator rei
deficit with china hit another record in 2011 with the value of chinese imports rising to almost $400 billion. but u.s. exports to china are also hitting record highs. >> china is now our third largest export market. and i don't think a lot of americans realize that. >> reporter: in fact, since the year 2000, 47 states have reported at least triple-digit export growth to china. including minnesota. the home of red wing shoes. >> china exports red wing shoe company have really taken off in the last five years. >> reporter: for red wing, the key is quality control. it says chinese-made products just don't measure up. >> the boots don't last as long. we are known for our leather. it's just a higher quality leather that's appreciated by that chinese customer. >> reporter: back in new york, fashion designer patrick ervel says his growing chinese fan base looks not only for quality but designs they can't find at home. >> now there is a bit of a cache, not just an american designer, but if you're manufacturing here, especially in menswear. >> reporter: why? >> just this idea of made in ameri
. there are basically three pieces to solving the deficit, right? one is spending and we have agrowed to $1.6 trillion in spending cuts in the last two years and the other is spending cuts. we put forth spending cuts of over $700 billion. not cutting care to seniors, but cutting overpayments to insurance companies. the burden of the deficit must not just be on the middle class. the wealthy have to kick in. we sent a bill to the house in july that says 98% americans, income up to 240,000 would continue to get tax cuts. above that, people would may more. they made excuses, the bill wasn't right. we have the bill in the house, the bill in the senate. the bottom line is when the speaker put on the floor last week the bill that would say, okay, how about everybody up to $1 million gets a tax cut. couldn't even pass that. we're stuck. we're really stuck. >> the house gop said they put a bill forward in august. so everyone sort of covering themselves saying we got a bill. we didn't ask to go over the fiscal cliff. i'm kind of glad at 3:00 this afternoon, both sides of the house leader smip and house are meet
intermediate deficit problem and implementation of the cost saving measures strengthened over time in the aca will deal with their long-term health care problem. so we are not that far away and we have other tremendous strengths in our country that would allow us to make the kind of investment to transform the economy, to do with the reality of stagnant wages and a sense of diminished opportunities. we have strengths. we can do it. we need the public to rain and behavior that's destructive and we need political leaders to act forcefully. given enough to bipartisan commissions and searched enough for bipartisan consensus. for sensible hard all politics along these lines. >> norm, i particularly cutie take the money question. a couple political had a great shared that showed that party polarization in congress was directly correlated with increasing concentrations of wealth from increasing equality went together artisan polarization. and the money question you can handle so many different ways. i'm really concerned about it posed citizens united system with a federal election commission that's
support it and its effort as everybody knows on the deficit reduction. i'm not sure that anybody really listened, at least they put in the effort. that's apolitical, by the way. so in addition, connie noted it was no surprise to her at the time that based on senator simpson's record in the senate and his bipartisanship work, that he would be chasing to be a cochair of the commission. lastly, i just want to say as we understand, mr. hardy had full access to senator simpson's records, diaries, finance, full access. i will say the senator did mention he's been married 57 years, so anybody that gives full access after 57 years, i think that's pretty impressive. but connie just really wanted to welcome everybody and say we are thrilled to be sponsoring this. [applause] >> nowcome i had the pleasure of introducing what i call the bravest man in the world, dawn hardy, author of the book. i don't you could possibly put all this in one book and decide what to leave in and what to take out at a 70s had senator simpson on msnbc cometh and then ann fox, you change the conversation about politics, c
, whether the deficit, people think about things the government can do to try to improve the job situation. and, fundamentally the concerns people have right now have to do with the fairness of the political system and the fairness of the economic system. that is the realm in which i think obama had an upper hand and played that. mitt romney making statements about 47% helped him in that regard it is not about class resentment. it is not middle income class and lower income resent middle- class people but the to the system as unfair. that the way benefits are distributed is unfair, and they want to see a system move in the direction of fairness. i think that theme played very well to obama and helped to overcome the headwinds he faced in that respect. but if it is there in a review of the election. then what i would like to do is open it up to more of a conversation and more of a question and answer. there are a lot of other things we steady besides voting and what voters decided. we study technology and how it is changing the way people engaged with campaigns. we study a lot about survey
revenues to pay down the deficit. has anybody called her on that, hey, look, you're only for raising rates for millionaires and above before now you're into the $400,000 level? >> i called her on it last week, and she avoided the question and didn't answer it directly. she said, we were trying to smoke out, that was her quote, smoke out republicans and steny hoyer himself mentioned that it was a ploy. so, i think they were trying to get republicans to agree to the millionaire tax increase and then see how far it will move even more. and it's politics, david. david: yeah, yeah. >> by the way the millionaire tax, only, it would basically raise money to cover eight days of government spending, but you know, david and adam, we've had the letter from nancy pelosi. do you really believe it was a ploy to smoke out the republicans? because nancy pelosi in her letter is equating millionaires to big oil, special interest and corporations. why doesn't the g.o.p. capitalize on that they really want middle class tax hikes when they're talking about raising taxes on the 250,000 plus crowd >> well, i thi
in terms of the deficit. nationally, you got all these people in the earlier segment playing blame game in washington. guess what? when you're spending more money than you pull in, eventually the money runs out. then you can blame all you want. but there is no money. for basic services, like police, like good education, all that stuff. they don't care about that. they spend the money on what they want to get elected. >> when you're saying that the previous mayor spent all the money, you're talking about mayor daly. rahm emanuel is in place now. >> right. >> he spent all the money on what? and then, two, what is the realistic proposal here to reverse the violence? >> well, over 20 years i can give you a laundry list of corruption and cronyism. but you know it well because you were here as well. and you saw it. there was a reporter once for "time" doing a cnn profile, comparing richard daly to andy of maybury and said he presides over chicago like andy of maybury. now that reporter is the press secretary for president obama. so there had been -- not you, obviously, but there had been peop
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)